Science

Media will have the opportunity June 4-5 for tours, interviews and photographs of NASA's Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) as it prepares to leave Vandenberg Air Force Base in California for a scheduled mid-June launch from Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine has named Steve Jurczyk as associate administrator, the agency's highest-ranking civil servant position [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Students from Pacoima and San Fernando, California, will have the opportunity to talk with astronauts on the International Space Station on Tuesday, May 22, as part of NASA's Year of Education on Station. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Astronauts soon will have new experiments to conduct related to emergency navigation, DNA sequencing and ultra-cold atom research when the research arrives at the International Space Station following the 4:44 a.m. EDT Monday launch of an Orbital ATK Cygnus spacecraft. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source

The Orbital ATK Antares rocket, with the Cygnus spacecraft onboard, launches from Pad-0A, Monday, May 21, 2018 at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Cygnus will deliver approximately 7,400 pounds of science and research, crew supplies and vehicle hardware to the International Space Station and its crew. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
The Orbital ATK Antares rocket, with the Cygnus spacecraft onboard, is seen at launch Pad-0A, Saturday, May 19, 2018, at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Liftoff is currently targeted for 4:39 a.m. Eastern on Monday, May 21. [...]
Sun, May 20, 2018, Continue reading at the source
NGC 1032 cleaves the quiet darkness of space in two in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. [...]
Fri, May 18, 2018, Continue reading at the source
An Orbital ATK rocket rolls out to launch Pad-0A at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on May 17, 2018, in advance of a May 21 launch from Wallops Island, VA. The Antares will launch a Cygnus spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. [...]
Fri, May 18, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Astronaut Ricky Arnold took this selfie during the May 16, 2018, spacewalk. [...]
Thu, May 17, 2018, Continue reading at the source

A joint U.S./German space mission to track the continuous movement of water and other changes in Earth's mass on and beneath the planet's surface successfully launched at 12:47 p.m. PDT Tuesday from the California coast. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists have combined an array of NASA satellite observations of Earth with data on human activities to map locations where freshwater is changing around the globe and to determine why. [...]
Wed, May 16, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Media are invited to cover the prelaunch briefing and launch of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO), NASA's latest Earth-observing satellite mission. [...]
Wed, May 16, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Media are invited to cover the prelaunch briefing and launch of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO), NASA's latest Earth-observing satellite mission. The briefing on Thursday, May 17, and launch on Saturday, May 19, will air on NASA Television and the agency's website. [...]
Fri, May 11, 2018, Continue reading at the source
A pair of new spacecraft that will observe our planet's ever-changing water cycle, ice sheets, and crust is in final preparations for a California launch no earlier than Saturday, May 19. [...]
Mon, Apr 30, 2018, Continue reading at the source

Hosts: Fraser Cain (universetoday.com / @fcain) Dr. Paul M. Sutter (pmsutter.com / @PaulMattSutter) Dr. Kimberly Cartier (KimberlyCartier.org / @AstroKimCartier ) Dr. Morgan Rehnberg (MorganRehnberg.com / @MorganRehnberg & ChartYourWorld.org) Special Guests: This week, we are extremely excited to welcome former NASA Astronaut Mike Massimino back to the Weekly Space Hangout in a segment he pre-recorded with Fraser back in April of this year. Mike, the first person ever to send a tweet from space, joins a group of eight elite astronauts to tell Earth's extraordinary story in National Geographic's new series, ONE STRANGE ROCK, executive produced by Darren Aronofsky's Protozoa Pictures and Jane Root's Nutopia. Having viewed Earth from space, Mike conveys his personal experiences of our planet and underscores how there really is no place like home. Mike served as an astronaut from 1996 to 2014. He is a veteran of two space flights: STS-109 in March 2002 and STS-125 in May 2009 – the final two Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. He was the last person to work inside of Hubble and set a team record with his crewmates for the most cumulative spacewalking time in a single space shuttle mission. He has logged a total of 571 hours and 47 minutes in space and 30 hours and 4 minutes of spacewalking. Mike received his Bachelor of Science degree from Columbia University and two Master of Science degrees and a Ph.D. from MIT. He has received a number of awards including two NASA Space Flight Medals, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal and the American Astronautical Society's 2009 Flight Achievement Award. Additionally, he is the holder of two patents and author of many engineering research papers. Mike lives in New York City, where he is an engineering professor at Columbia University and the senior advisor for space programs at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. He is author of the New York Times Bestseller Spaceman: An Astronaut's Unlikely Journey to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe and has made numerous television appearances, including National Geographic's late-night talk show StarTalk and had a six-time recurring role as himself on the CBS sitcom The Big Bang Theory. You can watch full episodes of One Strange Rock online at the Nat Geo website (http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/one-strange-rock/) including Episode 7, Terraform, featuring this week's guest, Mike Massimino. Announcements: If you would like to join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew, visit their site here and sign up. They're a great team who can help you join [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Solar SDO
A (nearly) naked Sol… more the norm than the exception these days. Credit: NASA/SDO AIA 512/1600 imager. Have you been keeping an eye on Sol lately? One of the top astronomy stories for 2018 may be what's not happening, and how inactive our host star has become. The strange tale of Solar Cycle #24 is ending with an expected whimper: as of May 8th, the Earthward face of the Sun had been spotless for 73 out of 128 days thus far for 2018, or more than 57% of the time. This wasn't entirely unexpected, as the solar minimum between solar cycle #23 and #24 saw 260 spotless days in 2009 – the most recorded in a single year since 1913. Cycle #24 got off to a late and sputtering start, and though it produced some whopper sunspots reminiscent of the Sol we knew and loved on 20th century cycles past, it was a chronic under-performer overall. Mid-2018 may see the end of cycle #24 and the start of Cycle #25… or will it? The story thus far… and the curious drama that is solar cycle #24. Credit: David Hathaway/NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center. One nice surprise during Cycle #24 was the appearance of massive sunspot AR 2192, which popped up just in time for the partial solar eclipse of October 23rd, 2014. Several times the size of the Earth, the spot complex was actually the largest seen in a quarter century. But just as “one swallow does not a Summer make,” one large sunspot group couldn't save Solar Cycle #24. The partial eclipse of the Sun, October 23, 2014, as seen from Jasper, Alberta, shot under clear skies through a mylar filter, on the front of a 66mm f/6 apo refractor using the Canon 60Da for 1/8000 (!) sec exposure at ISO 100. The colors are natural, with the mylar filter providing a neutral “white light” image. The big sunspot on the Sun that day is just beginning to disappear behind the Moon's limb. The mylar filter gave a white Sun, its natural colour, but I have tinted the Sun's disk yellow for a more pleasing view that is not just white Sun/black sky. Image credit and copyright: Alan Dyer/Amazing Sky.net The Sun goes through an 11-year sunspot cycle, marked by the appearance of new spots at mid- solar latitudes, which then slowly progress to make subsequent appearances closer towards the solar equator, in a pattern governed [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
This week's Carnival of Space is hosted by me at the CosmoQuest blog. Click here to read Carnival of Space #562 And if you're interested in looking back, here's an archive to all the past Carnivals of Space. If you've got a space-related blog, you should really join the carnival. Just email an entry to [email protected], and the next host will link to it. It will help get awareness out there about your writing, help you meet others in the space community – and community is what blogging is all about. And if you really want to help out, sign up to be a host. Send an email to the above address. The post Carnival of Space #562 appeared first on Universe Today. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Neutron stars are famous for combining a very high-density with a very small radius. As the remnants of massive stars that have undergone gravitational collapse, the interior of a neutron star is compressed to the point where they have similar pressure conditions to atomic nuclei. Basically, they become so dense that they experience the same amount of internal pressure as the equivalent of 2.6 to 4.1 quadrillion Suns! In spite of that, neutron stars have nothing on protons, according to a recent study by scientists at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. After conducting the first measurement of the mechanical properties of subatomic particles, the scientific team determined that near the center of a proton, the pressure is about 10 times greater than the pressure in the heart of a neutron star. The study which describes the team's findings, titled “The pressure distribution inside the proton“, recently appeared in the scientific journal Nature. The study was led by Volker Burkert, a nuclear physicist at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), and co-authored by Latifa Elouadrhiri and Francois-Xavier Girod – also from the TJNAF. Cross-section of a neutron star. Credit: Wikipedia Commons/Robert Schulze Basically , they found that the pressure conditions at the center of a proton were 100 decillion pascals – about 10 times the pressure at the heart of a neutron star. However, they also found that pressure inside the particle is not uniform, and drops off as the distance from the center increases. As Volker Burkert, the Jefferson Lab Hall B Leader, explained: “We found an extremely high outward-directed pressure from the center of the proton, and a much lower and more extended inward-directed pressure near the proton's periphery… Our results also shed light on the distribution of the strong force inside the proton. We are providing a way of visualizing the magnitude and distribution of the strong force inside the proton. This opens up an entirely new direction in nuclear and particle physics that can be explored in the future.” Protons are composed of three quarks that are bound together by the strong nuclear force, one of the four fundamental forces that government the Universe – the other being electromagnetism, gravity and weak nuclear forces. Whereas electromagnetism and gravity produce the effects that govern matter on the larger scales, weak and strong nuclear forces govern matter at the subatomic level. Previously, scientists thought that it was impossible to obtain detailed [...]
Sun, May 20, 2018, Continue reading at the source
In 1990, the Voyager 1 spaceprobe took a picture of Earth when it was about 6.4 billion km (4 billion mi) away. In this image, known as the “pale blue dot“, Earth and the Moon appeared as mere points of light because of the sheer distance involved. Nevertheless, it remains an iconic photo that not only showed our world from space, but also set long-distance record. As it turns out, NASA set another long-distance record for CubeSats last week (on May. 8th, 2018) when a pair of small satellites called Mars Cube One (MarCO) reached a distance of 1 million km (621,371 mi) from Earth. On the following day, one of the CubeSats (MarCO-B, aka. “Wall-E”) used its fisheye camera to take its own “pale blue dot” photo of the Earth-Moon system. The two CubeSats were launched on May 5th along with the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) lander, which is currently on its way to Mars to explore the planet's interior structure. As the first CubeSats to fly to deep pace, the purpose of the MarCO mission is to demonstrate if CubeSats are capable of acting as a relay with long-distance spacecraft. An artist's rendering of the twin Mars Cube One (MarCO) spacecraft as they fly through deep space. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech To this end, the probes will be responsible for monitoring InSight as it makes its landing on Mars in late November, 2018. The photo of Earth and the Moon was taken as part of the process used by the engineering team to confirm that the spacecraft's high-gain antenna unfolded properly. As Andy Klesh, MarCO's chief engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, indicated in a recent NASA press release: “Consider it our homage to Voyager. CubeSats have never gone this far into space before, so it's a big milestone. Both our CubeSats are healthy and functioning properly. We're looking forward to seeing them travel even farther.” This technology demonstration, and the long-distance record recently set by MarCO satellites, provides a good indication of just how far CubeSats have come in the past few years. Originally, CubeSats were developed to teach university students about satellites, but have since become a major commercial technology. In addition to providing vast amounts of data, they have proven to be a cost-effective alternative to larger, multi-million dollar satellites. The MarCO CubeSats will be there when the InSight lander accomplishes the most difficult part of its [...]
Fri, May 18, 2018, Continue reading at the source

The summer monsoon season in Colorado is still probably weeks away, but we got a spectacular preview today As I was leaving Boulder, Colorado this afternoon, heading for home out on the plains at the foot of the Rockies, I looked up and was stopped short by a giant, glowing thunderstorm cell that was building fast, in all dimensions. I've long been enamored of Western skies. That's true in all seasons, each of which brings its own wonders. But there's something particularly special about [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
A 'cloud camera' 40 miles away and high on a mountain captured the eerie glow emanating from continuing volcanic activity Last week I featured time-lapse video capturing the ash plume from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano exploding skyward higher than Mt. Everest. Now, the same camera, located on the Gemini North telescope atop 13,803-foot Mauna Kea, has captured yet another remarkable video. The new time-lapse shows the intense glow from an extensive region of volcanic fissures on Hawaii's Big [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Have paleontologists just been winging it? Up to 95 percent of the hip joint reconstructions of pterosaurs and their distant relatives, the most birdlike of dinosaurs, are anatomically impossible, according to new research that used a surprising source. But the study's conclusions, counters a pterosaur expert, should be grounded. Fleshing out an extinct animal from bones alone has always been paleontology's greatest challenge, and mistakes have been made. But a paper published today mak [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
In Michael Jackson's 1987 music video “Smooth Criminal,” the legendary performer leans forward 45 degrees from a straight-up position — and comes back. It's a feat that seemingly defies both physics and physiology, and the move has become another element of MJ's aura of mystery. Some type of cinematic or mechanical trick must be responsible, since most people can manage only a 20-degree forward tilt before toppling headlong. Yet Jackson performed the move live on tours around the world fo [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Worms have a way of appearing in strange, unwanted places: inside feet, eyeballs and stomachs. Turns out some are even invading countries. Giant predatory flatworms have inched their way into France and its overseas territories on four continents, according to a study released Tuesday in PeerJ. The invasive flatworms were documented by citizen scientists and managed to stay under the radar for more than two decades. This is the first study to cover the invasion. Wormy Worm The study is [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Citizen scientists used raw images from the Juno spacecraft to produce this southerly view of Jupiter This marvelous view of Jupiter shows the planet from a different perspective than we're used to: from the south. It was acquired by NASA's Juno spacecraft during a close flyby of the giant gaseous planet on April 1. During the encounter, Juno swooped as close as 10,768 miles above the cloud tops of the southern hemisphere. As NASA notes in a release, this color-enhanced view is unique [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Whether you're a fan of imperial or metric, this past Sunday was the day to celebrate the way we measure our surroundings. What better way to celebrate a day dedicated to measurement than to participate in a citizen science project where you weigh (or measure) something for science? We've pulled together some special projects that ask you to do just that: weigh or measure something in your kitchen, yard or the galaxy! Cheers! The SciStarter Team Sourdough for Science What's behind [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
What's the story, morning glory? Well, let me tell you: the sweet potato and other morning glory family members may have been around millions of years earlier than believed — after first sprouting thousands of miles from where many paleobotanists thought they evolved. Much like last year's discovery that nightshades (which include both the delicious, like tomatoes, and the deadly, such as belladonna) are much older than previously thought, researchers believe they have evidence that [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Less than a year ago, astronomers discovered ‘Oumuamua, the first known object from another star system to pass through our own. Now, in a new study published today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters, astronomers announced the discovery of the first interstellar object known to have taken up permanent residence around the Sun. A Perfect Fit Astronomers first discovered the asteroid in question, which has the succinct name (413107) 2015 BZ509 (or Bee-Zed for s [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
We all probably learned about photosynthesis, how plants turn sunlight into energy, in school. It might seem, therefore, that we figured out this bit of the world. But scientists are still learning new things about even the most basic stuff (see also the sun and moon), and photosynthesis is no different. In particular, according to a study released Monday in Nature Chemistry, an international team of scientists showed that molecules involved in photosynthesis display quantum mechanical be [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source

The first independent tests of the EmDrive suggest there's a mundane explanation for the wildly controversial device. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
It's not just a method of hunting or a strategy for battle anymore, and the athletes' training regimen is intense. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Scientists are using forensic techniques to help save African gray parrots, among the most illegally trafficked birds in the world. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
While on safari, a tourist had an encounter with a leopard that was far too close for comfort. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
The discovery of victims of a Germanic army that fought 2,000 years ago are surprising archaeologists for several reasons. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Some life on Earth can count, anticipate future events, and design railway networks without the distinctive organ. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
A rare fatal encounter in Washington State, which left another mountain biker injured, may point to wider questions about our evolving coexistence with big predators. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
In Denmark, people use an average of four single-use plastic bags a year, compared to one a day in the U.S. But that doesn't mean Danes are satisfied. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source

Exposure to early life trauma can elevate risk for poor physical and mental health in individuals and their children. A new epigenetics study in both men and mice posits that some of the vulnerability in children may derive from stress-associated reductions in microRNAs in their father's sperm. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Researchers have developed a new method to treat severe asthma. In a study of over 200 participants with severe asthma, the new treatment was shown to have improved asthma symptoms and lung function, while reducing the need for corticosteroids by up to 70%. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
New work enables optical microscopes to measure these nanometer-scale details with a new level of accuracy. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Usually, birds of a feather flock together -- but in the Amazon, some flocks feature dozens of species of all shapes and colors. A new study singles out one reason why these unusually diverse flocks exist: lookout species that call in alarm when they spot dangerous predators. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Chemists have shown a technique that can identify regions in a liquid crystal system where molecular order begins to emerge just before the system fully transitions from disordered to ordered states. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by traumatic military experiences is associated with feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness and/or guilt. New research is evaluating how PTSD symptoms increase risks for academic difficulties as well. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
In one of the first studies to try to map a gun market using network science, researchers used the novel scientific approach to understand how close offenders are to guns in the city of Chicago. Recreating Chicago's co-offending network of approximately 188,000 people, the researchers used data on firearms recovered by the Chicago Police Department to locate who in the network possessed those guns. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Researchers have developed new technology for decoding neuromuscular signals to control powered, prosthetic wrists and hands. The work relies on computer models that closely mimic the behavior of the natural structures in the forearm, wrist and hand. The technology could also be used to develop new computer interface devices for applications such as gaming and computer-aided design. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Fossil fuels have long been the precursor to plastic, but new research has detailed a technique for doubling the amount of carbon dioxide that gets converted to ethylene -- an essential component of the world's most common plastic. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
After a two-and-a-half-year expedition through the world's most biodiverse protected area, the Identidad Madidi explorers have concluded their epic quest of completing a massive biological survey of Madidi National Park, uncovering more than 120 potentially new species of plants, butterflies and vertebrates in the process. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source

In episode 153, Jack and Miles are joined by podcast host and writer J. Keith van Straaten to discuss the McGurk effect, Trump's royal decree on Twitter and Rod Rosenstein's response, the new commemorative coin for the North Korea peace talks that hasn't happened yet, voting machines still having the ability to be hacked and no one in Congress seeming to care, how Michael Cohen thinks The Onion is real, Publix censoring their cakes, & more! [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
No college degree in the world could prepare you to be the Duckmaster at the Peabody Hotel in Memphis, Tennessee. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Born in Corsica, Napoleon Bonaparte rose from obscurity during the French Revolution, crowning himself Emperor of France in 1804. This brilliant, ruthless tactician changed the course of French history. Despite his meteoric rise and bloodied fall, Bonaparte still needed to grab lunch once in a while. That's when the rabbits got him. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
From Oswald the Lucky Rabbit candies to today's mass-market collectibles, cartoons have driven an entire industry of branded merchandise. How did it go from pez dispensers to housewares to amusement parks? [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Gay men have been the target of many serial killers. The cases often go unsolved because men fear they'll be outed as gay if they talk. Do you hold the lead to solve one of these crimes? [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Footnotes for episode 153 of The Daily Zeitgeist which aired on 5.22.18. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Think your bed is cleaner than a chimp's? Researchers at North Carolina State University set out to find the answer. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
In which Raymond Carver becomes a literary superstar largely thanks to one brilliant, heavy-handed editor, and Ken and John share a very controversial Blade Runner take. Certificate #24875. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
We live in a time where computers can beat the best humans in the world at chess, checkers, poker and video games. But these games are really just demonstrations of how intelligent our machines are growing. They're growing more intelligent by the hour. With special guest, Tech Stuff's Jonathan Strickland. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Beth and Peter discuss their children's ongoing winter illnesses, the guilt of sending your kids to daycare sick, the pressure of having childless friends over, and why Peter hates YouTube. They rate themselves as parents, 3-year-old Bryn claims that the spanish word for fart is “fartalota,” and Peter cries over literal spilled milk. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source

The global south is rich in sustainability lessons that students deserve to hearThe global south is rich in sustainability lessons that students deserve to hear, Published online: 23 May 2018; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-05210-0A Western bias limits progress, so educators must share how communities in the developing world manage environmental change, argues Harini Nagendra. [...]
Tue, May 22, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Beware: transparency rule is a Trojan HorseBeware: transparency rule is a Trojan Horse, Published online: 22 May 2018; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-05207-9Like tobacco lobbyists and climate-change deniers, the US Environmental Protection Agency is co-opting scientific trappings to sow doubt, warns Naomi Oreskes. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Indonesian plan to clamp down on foreign scientists draws protest Indonesian plan to clamp down on foreign scientists draws protest , Published online: 22 May 2018; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-05001-7The government's proposals include stricter rules, and tougher penalties for researchers who break existing ones. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Rot, drills and inequity: the tangled tale of teethRot, drills and inequity: the tangled tale of teeth, Published online: 22 May 2018; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-05236-4Heidi Ledford tours an exhibition on all things odontological, from grisly dental implants to aluminium dentures. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Science needs clarity on Europe's data-protection lawScience needs clarity on Europe's data-protection law, Published online: 22 May 2018; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-05220-yAs a commendable European law on personal data comes into force, the research community must not let excessive caution about data sharing, however understandable, become the default position. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Synthetic yeast genome reveals its versatilitySynthetic yeast genome reveals its versatility, Published online: 22 May 2018; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-05164-3A redesigned yeast genome is being constructed to allow it to be extensively rearranged on demand. A suite of studies reveals the versatility of the genome-shuffling system, and shows how it could be used for biotechnology applications. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
Single-cell approaches to immune profilingSingle-cell approaches to immune profiling, Published online: 22 May 2018; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-05214-wProtein- and sequencing-based technologies are helping researchers to profile immune cells ever more deeply. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source
The incomparable life of Nikola Tesla, inside Chernobyl, and the wilder shores of consciousness: Books in briefThe incomparable life of Nikola Tesla, inside Chernobyl, and the wilder shores of consciousness: Books in brief, Published online: 22 May 2018; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-05212-yBarbara Kiser reviews five of the week's best science picks. [...]
Mon, May 21, 2018, Continue reading at the source