Food & Drink

Beverage companies are joining the legalization movement and positioning themselves for the future growth of “drinkable marijuana.” [...]
Fri, Aug 17, 2018, Continue reading at the source

From Napa to Châteauneuf, here's what the winemakers told us about making the King's cut. Plus, Médoc, Maipo, mayhem collide in epic new wine-painted wine comic; questionable '70s diet recommends wine, eggs, steak, coffee, nothing else [...]
Thu, Aug 16, 2018, Continue reading at the source
When it comes to Parisian wine programs, these restaurants offer the crème de la crème [...]
Thu, Aug 16, 2018, Continue reading at the source
A serious wine program in a German restaurant based on childhood wonder [...]
Thu, Aug 16, 2018, Continue reading at the source

Between work, our social lives, and basic day-to-day responsibilities, it's easy to lose sight of the wonderful people, places, and things right in front of us. We'll say it—we're not always as grateful as we should be. That's what Kristi Nelson, executive director at the nonprofit A Network for Grateful Living, thought when she helped create the organization's new book Everyday Gratitude: Inspiration for Living Life as a Gift ($12; amazon.com), which was released earlier this year. Chock full of quotes from famous thinkers and historical figures, the book is intended to inspire people to reflect on the good in their life and what they have to be thankful for. “It's not pursuing more that you get more,” Nelson says. “It's actually loving more what you already have that ends up yielding us more in our lives to be grateful for.” Although A Network for Grateful Living's website has long served as a go-to hub for gratitude and inspiration, the book takes things a step further. In addition to beautiful lettering and watercolors, each quote is also paired with a question to inspire a deeper impact on the reader's life. “There's a lot of contemplation behind the wisdom,” says Nelson. “The trick is to then allow that wisdom to catalyze our own contemplation.” As a stage 4 cancer survivor herself, Nelson believes in the power of changing your outlook on life one day at a time for the better. More than anything, Nelson hopes the book has a ripple effect. “I actually really like the idea of letting these questions and quotes be conversations at a dinner table, for instance. Questions you ask people at a party. Questions you ask a significant other or child every day,” she says. “I think it's a beautiful gift we can give ourselves. I also think it's an amazing gift we can give other people. And I don't mean that just in giving the book away, but in sharing the insights and the transformations that come in our own life as a result of being inspired.” Next time you're feeling down or in over your head, you might consider reading a page from this book; it might just give you the little boost you need. One of the primary founders of the organization Brother David Steindl-Rast may put it best: "It's not happiness that makes us grateful, it's gratefulness that makes us happy." [...]
Fri, Aug 17, 2018, Continue reading at the source
No one appreciates their sense of smell when they pass a trash heap or accidentally step in dog poop. But your nose knows a lot—not just when things stink. In fact, your ability to smell, or not, can tell you a lot about your health. Here, why you shouldn't take your whiffing powers for granted. Smelling something weird could predict a stroke Some people pick up on more scents than others, but brief episodes of smelling something completely off-base—like fish when there isn't any around—may be a sign of stroke or a seizure. The American Academy of Neurology says these "olfactory hallucinations" are usually unpleasant smells, but they can differ from person to person, according to the Mayo Clinic. According to a new study published in JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery, around 6.5% of people 40 and older may experience these smells that aren't really there, sometimes also called "phantom odors." Only 11% of people in the study had talked to a doctor about smell or taste concerns. Contact your doctor right away if your nose seems to be going haywire.RELATED: 10 Stroke Symptoms Everyone Should Know Imagining odors can precede a migraine While it's relatively uncommon, people may also hallucinate a smell as part of a pre-migraine aura, according to a review of research done by the Montefiore Headache Center. Again, the scents were mostly unpleasant: The most common were of things burning or decomposing.RELATED: 18 Signs You're Having a Migraine A bad sense of smell can signal an early death Feel like your sense of smell has gone south over the years? If it's less than stellar, it could be a tip-off that you're not in good health. A 2014 study from the University of Chicago Medical Center found that not being able to detect certain odors had an increased risk of dying within five years. A whopping 39% of older patients who couldn't pick up on scents like orange, rose, and peppermint died within that time frame, compared to only 19% of so-so smellers and 10% of good smellers. To get our top stories delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter Poor smell detection may be a sign of Alzheimer's Not being able to smell well could signal the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, according a Harvard Medical School study. Participants with elevated levels of amyloid plaques (telltale proteins found in the brains of Alzheimer's patients) who performed worse on [...]
Fri, Aug 17, 2018, Continue reading at the source
It's not news that many of the so-called “real” images you see on social media don't embody people's truths. Yet, that doesn't stop us from comparing our bodies (size, skin, hair, you name it) and our lives to people on Instagram, which can send us down a pretty dark rabbit hole. Luckily, model and fitness influencer Iskra Lawrence is here to tell us that the real you is good enough. Lawrence posted a side-by-side to Instagram of two photos of herself in a navy lace bralette. Although the images appear similar—same bra, same stance—there are noticeable differences. She writes that the picture on the left is “the REAL me,” while the one on the right is the FaceTuned version of herself after editing her skin tone, tummy, and face. “For me social media is the most damaging place where images are made to look ‘real and candid' but in reality 100 pics were taken and then they were Photoshopped or FaceTuned," Lawrence captions the photo. Scrolling through our feeds, we are only getting a glimpse—a very small, controlled window—into the lives of others. Chances are, the photo we are presented with may not be the reality of their situation. That fitness model's abs look perfect in her selfie, but we don't see a photo of her sitting down post-workout with natural stomach rolls (which we all have). That influencer posted a photo holding hands with their seemingly perfect S.O. or fiancé, and yet they could fight all the time. The photo of the social star smiling on vacation or enjoying a happy hour cocktail could be disguising a struggle with stress and anxiety that he or she feels every day, just like the rest of us. These perfectly posed, often edited images on Instagram can mask larger issues, like eating disorders, insecurities, and unhappiness. To get our top stories delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter Instagram only shows us what the person wants us to see, and these false realties are, well, damaging. In our daily scroll, we tend to internally bully ourselves with thoughts like Why can't I be thin like her? and Why can't my pores be that small? The hardest question of all may be, Are we supposed to look like this? Lawrence's response? “ABSOLUTELY NOT. THE REAL YOU IS GOOD ENOUGH,” she writes. “We cannot compare ourselves to unrealistic images. We cannot compare our real selves [...]
Thu, Aug 16, 2018, Continue reading at the source